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Doctrine2

Installation

If you use Codeception installed using composer, install this module with the following command:

composer require --dev codeception/module-doctrine2

Alternatively, you can enable Doctrine2 module in suite configuration file and run

codecept init upgrade4

This module was bundled with Codeception 2 and 3, but since version 4 it is necessary to install it separately.
Some modules are bundled with PHAR files.
Warning. Using PHAR file and composer in the same project can cause unexpected errors.

Description

Access the database using Doctrine2 ORM.

When used with Symfony or Zend Framework 2, Doctrine’s Entity Manager is automatically retrieved from Service Locator. Set up your functional.suite.yml like this:

modules:
    enabled:
        - Symfony # 'ZF2' or 'Symfony'
        - Doctrine2:
            depends: Symfony
            cleanup: true # All doctrine queries will be wrapped in a transaction, which will be rolled back at the end of each test

If you don’t use Symfony or Zend Framework, you need to specify a callback function to retrieve the Entity Manager:

modules:
    enabled:
        - Doctrine2:
            connection_callback: ['MyDb', 'createEntityManager'] # Call the static method `MyDb::createEntityManager()` to get the Entity Manager

By default, the module will wrap everything into a transaction for each test and roll it back afterwards (this is controlled by the cleanup setting). By doing this, tests will run much faster and will be isolated from each other.

To use the Doctrine2 Module in acceptance tests, set up your acceptance.suite.yml like this:

modules:
    enabled:
        - Symfony:
            part: SERVICES
        - Doctrine2:
            depends: Symfony

You cannot use cleanup: true in an acceptance test, since Codeception and your app (i.e. browser) are using two different connections to the database, so Codeception can’t wrap changes made by the app into a transaction.

Change purge mode doctrine fixtures:

modules:
    enabled:
        - Doctrine2:
            purge_mode: 1 //1 - DELETE, 2 - TRUNCATE, default DELETE

Status

Config

Public Properties

  • em - Entity Manager

Note on parameters

Every method that expects some parameters to be checked against values in the database (see...(), dontSee...(), grab...()) can accept instance of \Doctrine\Common\Collections\Criteria for more flexibility, e.g.:

$I->seeInRepository(User::class, [
    'name' => 'John',
    Criteria::create()->where(
        Criteria::expr()->endsWith('email', '@domain.com')
    ),
]);

If criteria is just a ->where(...) construct, you can pass just expression without criteria wrapper:

$I->seeInRepository(User::class, [
    'name' => 'John',
    Criteria::expr()->endsWith('email', '@domain.com'),
]);

Criteria can be used not only to filter data, but also to change the order of results:

$I->grabEntitiesFromRepository('User', [
    'status' => 'active',
    Criteria::create()->orderBy(['name' => 'asc']),
]);

Note that key is ignored, because actual field name is part of criteria and/or expression.

Actions

clearEntityManager

Performs $em->clear():

$I->clearEntityManager();

dontSeeInRepository

Flushes changes to database and performs findOneBy() call for current repository.

  • param $entity
  • param array $params

flushToDatabase

Performs $em->flush();

grabEntitiesFromRepository

Selects entities from repository. It builds query based on array of parameters. You can use entity associations to build complex queries.

Example:

<?php
$users = $I->grabEntitiesFromRepository(User::class, ['name' => 'davert']);
?>
  • Available since 1.1
  • param $entity
  • param array $params. For IS NULL, use ['field' => null]
  • return array

grabEntityFromRepository

Selects a single entity from repository. It builds query based on array of parameters. You can use entity associations to build complex queries.

Example:

<?php
$user = $I->grabEntityFromRepository(User::class, ['id' => '1234']);
?>
  • Available since 1.1
  • param $entity
  • param array $params. For IS NULL, use ['field' => null]
  • return object

grabFromRepository

Selects field value from repository. It builds query based on array of parameters. You can use entity associations to build complex queries.

Example:

<?php
$email = $I->grabFromRepository(User::class, 'email', ['name' => 'davert']);
?>
  • Available since 1.1
  • param $entity
  • param $field
  • param array $params

haveFakeRepository

Mocks the repository.

With this action you can redefine any method of any repository. Please, note: this fake repositories will be accessible through entity manager till the end of test.

Example:

<?php

$I->haveFakeRepository(User::class, ['findByUsername' => function($username) { return null; }]);

This creates a stub class for Entity\User repository with redefined method findByUsername, which will always return the NULL value.

  • param $classname
  • param array $methods

haveInRepository

Persists a record into the repository. This method creates an entity, and sets its properties directly (via reflection). Setters of the entity won’t be executed, but you can create almost any entity and save it to the database. If the entity has a constructor, for optional parameters the default value will be used and for non-optional parameters the given fields (with a matching name) will be passed when calling the constructor before the properties get set directly (via reflection).

Returns the primary key of the newly created entity. The primary key value is extracted using Reflection API. If the primary key is composite, an array of values is returned.

$I->haveInRepository(User::class, ['name' => 'davert']);

This method also accepts instances as first argument, which is useful when the entity constructor has some arguments:

$I->haveInRepository(new User($arg), ['name' => 'davert']);

Alternatively, constructor arguments can be passed by name. Given User constructor signature is __constructor($arg), the example above could be rewritten like this:

$I->haveInRepository(User::class, ['arg' => $arg, 'name' => 'davert']);

If the entity has relations, they can be populated too. In case of OneToMany the following format is expected:

$I->haveInRepository(User::class, [
    'name' => 'davert',
    'posts' => [
        ['title' => 'Post 1'],
        ['title' => 'Post 2'],
    ],
]);

For ManyToOne the format is slightly different:

$I->haveInRepository(User::class, [
    'name' => 'davert',
    'post' => [
        'title' => 'Post 1',
    ],
]);

This works recursively, so you can create deep structures in a single call.

Note that $em->persist(), $em->refresh(), and $em->flush() are called every time.

  • param string|object $classNameOrInstance
  • param array $data

loadFixtures

Loads fixtures. Fixture can be specified as a fully qualified class name, an instance, or an array of class names/instances.

<?php
$I->loadFixtures(AppFixtures::class);
$I->loadFixtures([AppFixtures1::class, AppFixtures2::class]);
$I->loadFixtures(new AppFixtures);

By default fixtures are loaded in ‘append’ mode. To replace all data in database, use false as second parameter:

<?php
$I->loadFixtures(AppFixtures::class, false);

This method requires doctrine/data-fixtures to be installed.

  • param string|string[]|object[] $fixtures
  • param bool $append @throws ModuleException @throws ModuleRequireException

onReconfigure

HOOK to be executed when config changes with _reconfigure.

persistEntity

This method is deprecated in favor of haveInRepository(). Its functionality is exactly the same.

refreshEntities

Performs $em->refresh() on every passed entity:

$I->refreshEntities($user);
$I->refreshEntities([$post1, $post2, $post3]]);

This can useful in acceptance tests where entity can become invalid due to external (relative to entity manager used in tests) changes.

  • param object|object[] $entities

seeInRepository

Flushes changes to database, and executes a query with parameters defined in an array. You can use entity associations to build complex queries.

Example:

<?php
$I->seeInRepository(User::class, ['name' => 'davert']);
$I->seeInRepository(User::class, ['name' => 'davert', 'Company' => ['name' => 'Codegyre']]);
$I->seeInRepository(Client::class, ['User' => ['Company' => ['name' => 'Codegyre']]]);
?>

Fails if record for given criteria can't be found,

  • param $entity
  • param array $params

 

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